AURELIA

ART AND LITERATURE THROUGH THE MOUTH OF THE FAIRY TALE

(Reaktion Books, 2017)

“Forget whatever you previously associated with “fairy tales,” and enter Carol Mavor’s kaleidoscopic universe of art and literature. Everyone from Ralph Eugene Meatyard to Kiki Smith to Frank Baum to Emmett Till to Francesca Woodman to Langston Hughes is here, and so many more, held together by Mavor’s casually erudite, finely spun web. Aurelia is as strange, enigmatic, and full of magic as its subjects.”
—Maggie Nelson

BLUE MYTHOLOGIES

REFLECTIONS ON A COLOUR

(Reaktion Books, 2013)

“Blue Mythologies succeeds in directing our eyes anew”
—Philip Hoare, Times Higher Education

“Mavor is at her somersaulting best, moving effortlessly between disciplines”
—Dylan J. Montanari, Los Angeles Review of Books

“Carol Mavor not only studies ‘blue,’ she bleeds it’s aesthetic and emotional resonances from a fresh perspective”
—Hayden White

BLACK AND BLUE

THE BRUISING PASSION OF CAMERA LUCIDA, LA JETÉE,
SANS SOLEIL AND HIROSHIMA MON AMOUR

(Duke UP, 2012)

“The overall effect is hypnotic, aided by the stunning visual affect of the book, its elegant typesetting and the variety of the images that litter the text. . . . a joy to read . . . a veritable feast for the eyes”
—Lucy Scholes, The Times Literary Supplement

“Carol Mavor has developed a unique way of responding to images and to their uses by artists and writers: with appetite and fastidious delicacy, she brings the full sensorium synaesthetically into play”
—Marina Warner

Black and Blue belongs to a growing number of first-person accounts that have coped with the years 1939–46 and after, including those by Sarah Kofman … and Jean-Luc Godard”
—Tom Conley

Black and Blue has a poetic logic of mourning, and its rage to make too much sense”
—Brian Dillon, Art Review

READING BOYISHLY

J.M. BARRIE, ROLAND BARTHES, JACQUES HENRIE LARTIGUE,
MARCEL PROUST AND D.W. WINNICOTT

(Duke UP, 2007)

“My book of the year is Reading Boyishly by Carol Mavor. It touched something very deep in me about what it is to be a creative man.”
—Grayson Perry, Turner-Prize Winner, The Guardian

“It is a sigh of relief, this book, a defense of things that make us feel guilty: nostalgia, apron strings, the ‘good-enough mother,’ the lost mother, the nest, the childhood home, the beauty of boys at play. . . . Food and kissing, eating and not eating, boredom and tenderness. Mavor’s is a style to be savored.”
—Susan Salter Reynolds, Los Angeles Times

“One of the best-looking books of the year.”
—Brian Dillon, Frieze

“An endlessly charming book.”
—Spencer Dew, Rain Taxi

“I love Mavor’s book.”
—Lucy Rollin, Children’s Literature Association Quarterly

“The book is unique, well researched, and visually stunning.”
—J. R. Mitrano, Choice

“Sprightly, witty, distinctly unlabored.”
—Richard Canning, The Gay and Lesbian Review Worldwide

“An absolute monster romp through the incredibly intricate tapestry of Oedipal desire, maternal attachment, and nostalgia.”
—Kathryn Adams, Leonardo

“A beautiful, deeply pleasurable, and thought-provoking new book.”
—Michael Payne, The Daily Item (Sunbury, PA)

“An embrace of what some have fretted about as an over-attachment to mothers.”
—Rebecca Wigod, Vancouver Sun

“With hedonistic pleasure, she offers exegetical indulgences and connections she has made in a lifetime of poring over texts, films, photographs, and other aspects of literary and visual culture.”
—William V. Ganis, Afterimage

Reading Boyishly is a rewarding read with surprising insights into the lives of some very intriguing people.”
—Simone O’Callaghan, Visual Studies

BECOMING

THE PHOTOGRAPHS OF CLEMENTINA, VISCOUNTESS HAWARDEN

(Duke UP, 1999)

“Mavor…is smart on the topic of teendom (just one of the ‘becomings’ of her title)”
The Village Voice

“To those accustomed to the detached tone of the academic monograph, Carol Mavor’s stance in Becoming will seem daring. From the effusive acknowledgments onwards, the author thrusts herself to the front, so that her particular appreciation of what she studies becomes both subject and critical method”
The Times Literary Supplement

PLEASURES TAKEN

PERFORMANCES OF SEXUALITY AND LOSS IN VICTORIAN PHOTOGRAPHS

(Duke UP, 1995)

“Under her clever, searching eye and in her greedily epicurean hands, these pictures cease to be the faded work of hidden Victorians. Mavor exults in the risks they take, in the way the images flaunt their subjects’ and their makers’ own desires”
– Marina Warner, The Times Literary Supplement